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Tag: Nuri al-Maliki

Sunni and Shiite Muslims Battle for Control of Holy Site

Shiite and Sunni Muslims have been killing each other for years over trivial differences in the way they interpret the Koran. The violence took a turn for the worse in 2006 when the two sects began fighting for control over the Askariya Shrine in Samarra, a site that has been deemed holy. Since then, retaliatory attacks have been exchanged and left hundreds of civilians dead.

A recent attack by a suicide bomber who rammed his car into a Shiite religious building killed 18 and left 125 wounded. Later that day, a bomb was found lodged in the back of a Sunni Endowment office. The area was cordoned off where police safely detonated it.

Sunni and Shiite endowment offices are the logistical centers for religious matters regarding mosques and cultural locations. The two authorities have been disputing over how the Askariya shrine and surrounding perimeter should be reconstructed and developed.

While violence in Iraq has quelled in recent months, sectarian attacks remain a serious epidemic. Just a few days before, a series of bombings took place at a Shiite neighborhood market, killing 17 and injuring scores of others.

Some locals suspect that some of the attacks are orchestrated by government officials, as it is believed that some who hold office have ties to militia.

Following the 2006 bombing, an army brigade was dispatched to seize control of the shrine from the Sunni locals. This began a steady transition where rights to the shrine were given to the Shiite endowment. Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, however, has taken measures to prevent full control from being granted to the Shiites. Sunni officials from Sumarra have vowed to take legal action to limit Shiite authority over the shrine.

Though Sunni Muslims are the minority, they held control over most of Iraqi policy and law. That is, until the U.S. invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein’s reign. Since then, the tide has shifted to the Shiite majority. This has created embitterment that led to the back and forth violence that has resulted in nothing other than countless civilian deaths.

The Osirak Payback?

Here’s a good classroom discussion:

Iraq has demanded that Israel pay a compensation for bombing the unfinished nuclear reactor at Osirak in 1981. A justified demand?

Actually Muhammad Naji Muhammad is planning to enlist the United Nation’s help to put pressure on the Jewish Country to compensate Baghdad, for its world famous stealth mission.

“Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki and the Foreign Ministry turned to the UN and the Security Council demanding that Israel pay us reparations for damage caused to the reactor in 1981.”

Firstly, Baghdad is demanding that the UN establish a committee to assess the scope of the damage caused by the Israeli strike in order to calculate an appropriate compensation fee.

Iraq is basing its demand on UN Security Council Resolution 487. The resolution was drafted following the bombing of the reactor in June 1981. It harshly condemned Israel’s aerial stealth and said that Iraq had a right to demand compensation over the damages.

Of course the resolution came before the “Gulf War” of 1990-91, when Saddam Hussein decided to fire missiles at Tel Aviv.

Meanwhile, Iraq has decided that the time is right to build a new reactor.

“We are co-operating with the IAEA and expanding and defining areas of research where we can implement nuclear technology for peaceful means,”

Iraqi science and technology minister Raid Fahmi told a British newspaper.

“After the dissolution [of the regime] we did not have an industry, but we have become more and more conscious of the need for nuclear technology. This was raised several months ago with the relevant bodies.”

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